Today in History

1429 – Armagnac–Burgundian Civil War: Joan of Arc liberates Saint-Pierre-le-Moûtier.
1501 – Catherine of Aragon (later Henry VIII’s first wife) meets Arthur Tudor, Henry VIII’s older brother – they would later marry.
1576 – Eighty Years’ War: In Flanders, Spain captures Antwerp (after three days the city is nearly destroyed).
1677 – The future Mary II of England marries William, Prince of Orange; they later jointly reign as William and Mary.
1737 – The Teatro di San Carlo is inaugurated.
1780 – The Rebellion of Túpac Amaru II against Spanish rule in the Viceroyalty of Peru begins.
1783 – Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart’s Symphony No. 36 is performed for the first time in Linz, Austria.
1791 – The Western Confederacy of American Indians wins a major victory over the United States in the Battle of the Wabash.
1798 – Beginning of the Russo-Ottoman siege of Corfu.
1839 – Newport Rising: The last large-scale armed rebellion against authority in mainland Britain.
1847 – Sir James Young Simpson, a Scottish physician, discovers the anaesthetic properties of chloroform.
1852 – Camillo Benso, Count of Cavour becomes the prime minister of Piedmont-Sardinia, which soon expands to become Italy.
1864 – American Civil War: Battle of Johnsonville: Confederate troops bombard a Union supply base and destroy millions of dollars in material.
1868 – Camagüey, Cuba revolts against Spain during the Ten Years’ War.
1890 – City and South London Railway: London’s first deep-level tube railway opens between King William Street and Stockwell.
1912 – First Balkan War: The First Battle of Çatalca begins – an attempt by Bulgaria to break through the last defensive line before the Turkish capital Constantinople.
1918 – World War I: The Armistice of Villa Giusti between Italy and Austria-Hungary is implemented.
1921 – The Saalschutz Abteilung (hall defense detachment) of the Nazi Party is renamed the Sturmabteilung (storm detachment) after a large riot in Munich.
1921 – Japanese Prime Minister Hara Takashi is assassinated in Tokyo.
1922 – In Egypt, British archaeologist Howard Carter and his men find the entrance to Tutankhamun’s tomb in the Valley of the Kings.
1924 – Nellie Tayloe Ross of Wyoming is elected the first female governor in the United States.
1924 – Calvin Coolidge wins a full term as President of the United States.
1939 – World War II: U.S. President Franklin D. Roosevelt orders the United States Customs Service to implement the Neutrality Act of 1939, allowing cash-and-carry purchases of weapons by belligerents.
1942 – World War II: Second Battle of El Alamein: Disobeying a direct order by Adolf Hitler, General Field Marshal Erwin Rommel leads his forces on a five-month retreat.
1944 – World War II: Bitola Liberation Day
1952 – The United States government establishes the National Security Agency, or NSA.
1952 – Dwight D. Eisenhower is elected the 34th President of the United States.
1956 – Soviet troops enter Hungary to end the Hungarian revolution against the Soviet Union, that started on October 23. Thousands are killed, more are wounded, and nearly a quarter million leave the country.
1960 – At the Kasakela Chimpanzee Community in Tanzania, Dr Jane Goodall observes chimpanzees creating tools, the first-ever observation in non-human animals.
1962 – The United States concludes Operation Fishbowl, its final above-ground nuclear weapons testing series, in anticipation of the 1963 Partial Nuclear Test Ban Treaty.
1966 – The Arno River floods Florence, Italy, to a maximum depth of 6.7 m (22 ft), leaving thousands homeless and destroying millions of masterpieces of art and rare books. Also Venice was submerged on the same day at its record all-time acqua alta of 194 cm.
1970 – Vietnam War: Vietnamization: The United States turns control of the air base at Bình Thủy in the Mekong Delta over to South Vietnam.
1970 – Salvador Allende takes office as President of Chile, the first Marxist to become president of a Latin American country through open elections.
1973 – The Netherlands experiences the first Car-Free Sunday caused by the 1973 oil crisis. Highways are used only by cyclists and roller skaters.
1979 – Iran hostage crisis: A mob of Iranians, mostly students, overruns the US embassy in Tehran and takes 90 hostages (53 of whom are American).
1980 – Ronald Reagan is elected the 40th President of The United States, defeating incumbent Jimmy Carter.
1993 – China Airlines Flight 605, a brand new 747-400, overruns the runway at Kai Tak Airport.
1995 – Israeli prime minister Yitzhak Rabin is assassinated by an extremist Israeli.
2002 – Chinese authorities arrest cyber-dissident He Depu for signing a pro-democracy letter to the 16th Communist Party Congress.
2008 – Barack Obama becomes the first person of biracial or African-American descent to be elected President of the United States.
2010 – Aero Caribbean Flight 883 crashes into Guasimal, Sancti Spíritus. All 68 passengers and crew were killed.
2010 – Qantas Flight 32, an Airbus A380, suffers an uncontained engine failure over Indonesia shortly after taking off from Singapore, crippling the jet. The crew manage to safely return to Singapore, saving all 469 passengers and crew.
2015 – A cargo plane crashes shortly after takeoff from Juba International Airport in Juba, South Sudan, killing 37 people.
2015 – A building collapses in the Pakistani city of Lahore resulting in at least 45 deaths, at least 100 injured.

Via: Wikipedia

Today in History

31 B.C. – The Roman leader Octavian defeated the alliance of Mark Antony and Cleopatra. Octavian, as Augustus Caesar, became the first Roman emperor.

1666 – The Great Fire of London broke out. The fire burned for three days destroying 10,000 buildings including St. Paul’s Cathedral. Only 6 people were killed.

1775 – Hannah, the first American war vessel was commissioned by General George Washington.

1789 – The U.S. Treasury Department was established.

1864 – During the U.S. Civil War Union forces led by Gen. William T. Sherman occupied Atlanta following the retreat of the Confederates.

1897 – The first issue of “McCall’s” magazine was published. The magazine had been known previously as “Queens Magazine” and “Queen of Fashion.”

1901 – Theodore Roosevelt, then Vice President, said “Speak softly and carry a big stick” in a speech at the Minnesota State Fair.

1930 – The “Question Mark” made the first non-stop flight from Europe to the U.S. The plane was flown by Captain Dieudonne Coste and Maurice Bellonte.

1938 – The first railroad car to be equipped with fluorescent lighting was put into operation on the New York Central railroad.

1945 – Japan surrendered to the U.S. aboard the USS Missouri, ending World War II. The war ended six years and one day after it began.

1945 – Ho Chi Minh declared the independence the Democratic Republic of Vietnam.

1961 – The U.S.S.R. resumed nuclear weapons testing. Test ban treaty negotiations had failed with the U.S. and Britain when the three nations could not agree upon the nature and frequency of on-site inspections.

1962 – Ken Hubbs (Chicago Cubs) set a major-league baseball fielding record when he played errorless for his 74th consecutive game.

1963 – The integration of Tuskegee High School was prevented by state troopers assigned by Alabama Gov. George Wallace. Wallace had the building surrounded by state troopers.

1963 – “The CBS Evening News” was lengthened from 15 to 30 minutes.

1969 – NBC-TV canceled “Star Trek.” The show had debuted on September 8, 1966.

1973 – Billy Martin was fired as manager of the Detroit Tigers. Martin was relieved of his duties three days after ordering his pitchers to throw spitballs against Cleveland Indians batters.

1985 – It was announced that the Titanic had been found on September 1 by a U.S. and French expedition 560 miles off Newfoundland. The luxury liner had been missing for 73 years.

1991 – The U.S. formally recognized the independence of Lithuania, Lativa and Estonia.

1992 – The U.S. and Russia agreed to a joint venture to build a space station.

1996 – Muslim rebels and the Philippine government signed a pact formally ending 26-years of insurgency that had killed more than 120,000 people.

1998 – In Canada, pilots for Canada’s largest airline launch their first strike in Air Canada’s history.

2004 – The Crisis in Beslan commences when armed terrorists take schoolchildren and school staff hostage in North Ossetia (Russia); by the end of the siege three days later more than 385 people are dead (including hostages, other civilians, security personnel and terrorists)

2007 11th World Championships in Athletics close at Osaka, Japan

2008 54th National Film Awards (India): “Pulijanmam” wins the Golden Lotus

2009 66th Venice Film Festival: “Lebanon” directed by Samuel Maoz wins Golden Lion

2012 15 people are killed by a car bomb attack at a refugee camp in Sbeineh, Palestine

2012 A decades-long ban on veiled female news presenters is lifted from State television in Egypt

2015 Earth’s trees number just over 3 trillion according to study in “Nature” by Thomas Crowther of Yale University

2015 US President Barack Obama becomes the first president to visit the Arctic Circle at Kotzebue, Alaska

 

Today in History

1799 – The Bank of Manhattan Company opened in New York City, NY. It was the forerunner of Chase Manhattan.

1807 – Former U.S. Vice President Aaron Burr was found innocent of treason.

1810 – The first plow with interchangeable parts was patented by John J. Wood.

1859 – The Pullman sleeping car was placed into service.

1878 – Emma M. Nutt became the first female telephone operator in the U.S. The company was the Telephone Dispatch Company of Boston.

1884 – The Thomas A. Edison Construction Department and the Edison Company for Isolated Lighting merged.

1887 – Emile Berliner filed for a patent for his invention of the lateral-cut, flat-disk gramophone. It is a device that is better known as a record player. Thomas Edison made the idea work.

1897 – The first section of Boston’s subway system was opened.

1905 – Saskatchewan and Alberta became the ninth and tenth provinces of Canada.

1906 – Jack Coombs of the American League’s Philadelphia Athletics pitched 24 innings against the Boston Red Sox. (MLB)

1922 – The first daily news program on radio was “The Radio Digest,” on WBAY radio in New York City, NY.

1939 – World War II began when Germany invaded Poland.

1942 – A federal judge in Sacramento, CA, upheld the wartime detention of Japanese-Americans as well as Japanese nationals.

1945 – The U.S. received official word of Japan’s formal surrender that ended World War II. In Japan, it was actually September 2nd.

1949 – “Martin Kane, Private Eye” debuted on NBC-TV.

1951 – The ANZUS Treaty, a mutual defense pact, was signed by the U.S., Australia and New Zealand.

1969 – Col. Moammar Gadhafi came into power in Libya after the government was overthrown.

1970 – The last episode of “I Dream of Jeannie” aired on NBC-TV. The show premiered was on September 18, 1965.

1971 – Danny Murtaugh (Pittsburgh Pirates) gave his lineup card to the umpire with the names of nine black baseball players on it. This was a first for Major League Baseball.

1972 – America’s Bobby Fischer beat Russia’s Boris Spassky to become world chess champion. The chess match took place in Reykjavik, Iceland.

1979 – The U.S. Pioneer 11 became the first spacecraft to visit Saturn.

1982 – J.R. Richard returned to major league baseball after a two-year absence following a near-fatal stroke.

1982 – Mexican President Jose Lopez Portillo closed all the country’s private banks.

1985 – The Titanic was found by Dr. Robert Ballard and Jean Louis Michel in a joint U.S. and French expedition. The wreck site is located 963 miles northeast of New York and 453 miles southeast of the Newfoundland coast.

1986 – Jerry Lewis raised a record $34 million for Muscular Dystrophy during his annual telethon for Jerry’s kids over the Labor Day weekend.

1997 – In France, the prosecutor’s office announced that the driver of the car, in which Britain’s Princess Diana was killed, was over the legal alcohol limit.

1998 – The movie “Titanic” went on sale across North America.

1998 – Mark McGwire (St. Louis Cardinals) hit his 56th and 57th homeruns to set a new National League record. He would eventually reach a total of 70 for the season on September 27.

1998 – J.K. Rowling’s book “Harry Potter and the Sorcerer’s Stone” was released in the U.S. This was the first book in the Harry Potter series.

1998 – Vietnam released 5,000 prisoners, including political dissidents, on National Day.

1999 – Twenty-two of major league baseball’s 68 permanent umpires were replaced. The problem arose from their union’s failed attempt to force an early start to negotiations for a new labor contract.

2004 – The Crisis in Beslan commences when armed terrorists take schoolchildren and school staff hostage in North Ossetia (Russia); by the end of the siege three days later more than 385 people are dead (including hostages, other civilians, security personnel and terrorists).

2010 67th Venice Film Festival: “Somewhere” directed by Sofia Coppola wins Golden Lion

2012 Two suicide bombings kill 12 people and wound 50 in a NATO base in Afghanistan’s Sayed Abad district

2012 US drone strike kills 5 people in North Waristan, Pakistan

2012 Islamist rebels seize Douentza, Mali

2012 Grenade injures 41 festival celebrants in Paquibato, Philippines

2013 Gareth Bale is transferred to Real Madrid for a sum of €100.8 million, a new record for a transfer fee

2015 Google changes its logo, biggest redesign since 1999

2015 EU Migrant Crisis: Hungary closes Keleti Railway Station in Budapest to try and stop migrants travelling

What happened On This Day

1056 Byzantine Empress Theodora becomes ill, dying suddenly a few days later, without children to succeed the throne, ending the Macedonian dynasty
1142 Possible date for establishment of the Iroquois (Haudenosaunee) League – with the aid of Hiawatha and Deganawidah
1945 The Liberal Party of Australia is founded by Robert Menzies

1957 Federation of Malaya gains independence from Great Britain
1994 The Provisional Irish Republican Army declares a ceasefire
1997 Diana, Princess of Wales, dies in a car crash in a road tunnel in Paris

1999 – The first of a series of bombings in Moscow kills one person and wounds 40 others.
1999 – A LAPA Boeing 737-200 crashes during takeoff from Jorge Newbury Airport in Buenos Aires, killing 65, including two on the ground.
2005 – The 2005 Al-Aaimmah bridge stampede in Baghdad kills 1,199 people.
2006 – Edvard Munch’s famous painting The Scream, stolen on August 22, 2004, is recovered in a raid by Norwegian police.
2016 – Brazil’s President Dilma Rousseff is impeached and removed from office.
Births

 

On This Day

1146 – European leaders outlawed the crossbow.

1645 – American Indians and the Dutch made a peace treaty at New Amsterdam. New Amsterdam later became known as New York.

1682 – William Penn sailed from England and later established the colony of Pennsylvania in America.

1780 – General Benedict Arnold secretly promised to surrender the West Point fort to the British army.

1806 – New York City’s second daily newspaper, the “Daily Advertiser,” was published for the last time.

1809 – Charles Doolittle Walcott first discovered fossils near Burgess Pass. He named the site Burgess Shale after nearby Mt. Burgess.

1862 – The Confederates defeated Union forces at the second Battle of Bull Run in Manassas, VA.

1905 – Ty Cobb made his major league batting debut with the Detroit Tigers.

1928 – The Independence of India League was established in India.

1941 – During World War II, the Nazis severed the last railroad link between Leningrad and the rest of the Soviet Union.

1945 – General Douglas MacArthur set up Allied occupation headquarters in Japan.

1951 – The Philippines and the United States signed a defense pact.

1956 – In Louisianna, the Lake Pontchartrain Causeway opened.

1960 – A partial blockade was imposed on West Berlin by East Germany.

1963 – The “Hotline” between Moscow and Washington, DC, went into operation.

1965 – Thurgood Marshall was confirmed by the U.S. Senate as a Supreme Court justice. Marshall was the first black justice to sit on the Supreme Court.

1982 – P.L.O. leader Yasir Arafat left Beirut for Greece.

1983 – The space shuttle Challenger blasted off with Guion S. Bluford Jr. aboard. He was the first black American to travel in space.

1984 – The space shuttle Discovery lifted off for the first time. On the voyage three communications satellites were deployed.

1984 – U.S. President Ronald Reagan, and several others, were inducted into the Sportscasters Hall of Fame.

1991 – The Soviet republic of Azerbaijan declared its independence.

1993 – On CBS-TV “The Late Show with David Letterman” premiered.

1994 – Rosa Parks was robbed and beaten by Joseph Skipper. Parks was known for her refusal to give up her seat on a bus in 1955, which sparked the civil rights movement.

1994 – The largest U.S. defense contractor was created when the Lockheed and Martin Marietta corporations agreed to a merger.

1996 – An expedition to raise part of the Titanic failed when the nylon lines being used to raise part of the hull snapped.

1999 – The residents of East Timor overwhelmingly voted for independence from Indonesia. The U.N. announced the result on September 4.

2002 – Conoco Inc. and Phillips Petroleum merged to create ConocoPhillips. The new company was the third largest integrated energy company and the second largest refining company in the U.S.

2006 63rd Venice Film Festival: “Still Life” directed by Jia Zhangke wins Golden Lion
2012 Cholera outbreak kills 229 people in Sierra Leone
2012 A blast in the in the Xiaojiawan coal mine, China, kills 26 miners with 21 missing

2013 15 people are killed by a liquid ammonia leak at a cold storage plant in Shanghai, China
2013 “12 Years a Slave” based on the memoir by Solomon Northup, directed by Steve McQueen and starring Chiwetel Ejiofor, Michael Fassbender and Benedict Cumberbatch premieres at the Telluride Film Festival (Best Picture 2014)
2015 15th World Championships in Athletics close at Beijing, China
2015 English author Frederick Forsyth (The Day of the Jackal) reveals that he worked for MI6 for more than 20 years
2015 Former Malaysian Prime Minister Mahathir Mohamad calls for the removal of current Prime Minister Najib Razak during 2nd day of street protests

 

Today in History August 29

70 The Temple of Jerusalem burns after a nine-month Roman siege.

1526 Ottoman Suleiman the Magnificent crushes a Hungarian army under
Lewis II at the Battle of Mohacs.

1533 In Peru, the Inca chief Atahualpa is executed by orders of Francisco Pizarro, although the chief had already paid his ransom.

1776 General George Washington retreats during the night from Long Island to New York City.

1793 Slavery is abolished in Santo Domingo.

1862 Union General John Pope’s army is defeated by a smaller Confederate force at the Second Battle of Bull Run.

1882 Australia defeats England in cricket for the first time. The following day a obituary appears in the Sporting Times addressed to the British team.

1942 The American Red Cross announces that Japan has refused to allow safe conduct for the passage of ships with supplies for American prisoners of war.

1945 U.S. airborne troops are landed in transport planes at Atsugi airfield, southwest of Tokyo, beginning the occupation of Japan.

1949 USSR explodes its first atomic bomb, “First Lightning.”

1950 International Olympic Committee votes to allow West Germany and Japan to compete in 1952 games.

1952 In the largest bombing raid of the Korean War, 1,403 planes of the Far East Air Force bomb Pyongyang, North Korea.

1957 US Congress passes Civil Rights Act of 1957 after Strom Thurmond (Sen-D-SC) ends 24-hour filibuster, the longest in Senate history, against the bill.

1960 US U-2 spy plane spots SAM (surface-to-air) missile launch pads in Cuba.

1964 Mickey Mantle ties Babe Ruth’s career strikeout record (1,330).

1965 Astronauts L. Gordon Cooper Jr. and Charles “Pete” Conrad Jr complete 120 Earth orbits in Gemini 5, marking the first time the US set an international duration record for a manned space mission.

1966 The Beatles give their last public concert (Candlestick Park, San Francisco).

1968 Democrats nominate Hubert H Humphrey for president at their Chicago convention.

1977 Lou Brock (St Louis Cardinals) breaks Ty Cobb’s 49-year-old career stolen bases record at 893.

1986 Morocco’s King Hassan II signs unity treaty with Libya’s Muammar Gaddafi, strengthening political and economic ties and creating a mutual defense pact.

1991 USSR’s parliament suspends Communist Party activities in the wake of a failed coup.

1992 Thousands of Germans demonstrate against a wave of racist attacks aimed at immigrants.

1995 NATO launches Operation Deliberate Force against Bosnian Serb forces.

2003 A terrorist bomb kills Ayatollah Sayed Mohammed Baqir al-Hakim, the Shia Muslim leader in Iraq, and nearly 100 worshipers as they leave a mosque in Najaf where the ayatollah had called for Iraqi unity.

2005 Rains from Hurricane Katrina cause a levee breech at the Industrial Canal in New Orleans, causing severe flooding.

2012 The Egyptian Army’s Operation Eagle results in the deaths of 11 suspected terrorists and the arrest of another 23.

Born on August 29

1632 John Locke, philosopher of liberalism whose ideas influenced the American founding fathers, famous for his treatise An Essay Concerning Human Understanding.

1809 Oliver Wendell Holmes, Sr., poet, essayist and father of Supreme Court Justice Oliver Wendell Holmes, Jr.

1898 Preston Sturges, screenwriter, film director and playwright.

1915 Ingrid Bergman, Oscar winning actress famous whose films include Casablanca and Anastasia.

1920 Charlie “Bird” Parker, self-taught jazz saxophonist, pioneer of the new “cool” movement.

1923 Richard Attenborough, actor, (The Great Escape, Jurassic Park) Academy Award–winning director and producer (Gandhi)

1924 Dinah Washington, singer known in the 50s as “Queen of the Harlem Blues.”.

1927 Marion Williams, gospel singer.

1931 Lise Payette, Quebec politician, writer and columnist.

1933 Jehan Sadat, First Lady of Egypt (1970–1981); widow of Anwar Sadat.

1935 William Friedkin, director, producer, writer (The Exorcist, The French Connection).

1936 John McCain, Republican US presidential nominee (2008) .

1938 Elliott Gould, actor (M*A*S*H, Bob & Carol & Ted & Alice).

1940 James Brady, press secretary who was severely wounded during John Hinckley Jr.’s attempt to assassinate US President Ronald Reagan.

1941 Robin Leach, TV host (Life Styles of the Rich and Famous).

1943 Richard Halligan, vocalist with band Blood Sweat & Tears.

1952 Karen Hesse, Newbery Medal–winning author of children’s literature (Out of the Dust).

1958 Michael Jackson, pop singer, entertainer.